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Who's your Daddy

Yes, I read lots of non-fiction, not as much recently as I would like. Mostly early American History, but I have another (of many) interes...

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Who lived here anyway?

A fast method for finding the original owners of your house if you know the date the house was built, can be quite easy if that date lies close to a census date.  My house was built in 1928, so to quickly find the probable owners I went to the 1930 census on ancestry.com and did a bit of crafty searching.

If you go to the correct census search page on ancestry.com (1930 census), on the right you will find "browse this collection" by state, county, and township/enumeration district.

State, county, and township is easy and self explanatory.  One you plug in your township you will be able to search enumeration district.  This you may not readily know, but if you scroll each district (which usually is listed by smaller groups within the township and even street names.  Once you narrow this search as close as possible by cross streets/neighboring streets, you can scroll through the pages (looking on the far left of each page at angle will be the street.  In the next column will be the street number.  There are other ways to search, but I have found this to be the most expedient, at least for now.

This can also help in your search for ancestors.  Many people new to searching for their family tree don't realize what great info they can find in a census record.  Each census year holds different types of information that you can miss if you don't read all the fine print.  And, I mean fine!  So, have a magnifying glass handy if you can't enlarge it big enough.  Happy hunting!!
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